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14 Markers of a Problematic Residency Application

2017-12-18T13:52:21+00:00

by Pedram Mizani, MD, MHSA, family physician and chief clinical officer of the AmeriClerkships Medical Society

Published in Residency Program Alert* on September 2017.

September 15 marks the start of the main residency Match season. For the most part, each residency program’s highly tailored—and often subjective—residency application screening process yields a high enough number of interviewees to provide an adequate statistical probability for the National Resident Matching Program’s (NRMP) Match algorithm to consistently fill about 95% of residency slots. However, the process and outcome for the unfilled 5% of slots that are reintroduced to residency candidates during the annual Match week’s Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program are the subject of incredible debate and anxiety.

Download the full article below, for free.

Download the article

Published with permission from HCPro/Residency Program Alert. Also published on HCPro.

* About Residency Program Alert: Residency program managers in all specialties are challenged to effectively manage their programs as accrediting agencies focus on outcome measures, the core competencies, proper documentation, resident supervision, and program, faculty, and resident evaluation. Add to those responsibilities the challenge to prepare for site visits, develop budgets for your program, and mitigate legal risks. Residency Program Alert is the source you need to confidently meet these challenges. This monthly resource provides residency managers with essential tips, tools, and best practices from the most well-respected, in-the-trenches experts. Dr. Pedram Mizani, the AmeriClerkships’ Chief Clinical Officer, is a writer and contributors to Residency Program Alert.
14 Markers of a Problematic Residency Application 2017-12-18T13:52:21+00:00

10 Considerations when Handling Re-entering Residents

2017-12-20T14:44:06+00:00

by Pedram Mizani, MD, MHSA, family physician and chief clinical officer of the AmeriClerkships Medical Society

Published in Residency Program Alert* on July 2017.

Nearly every medical student I speak with says they have never heard of a medical resident losing his or her residency position, yet over 10,000 medical residents have been subject to dismissal or withdrawal from U.S. medical residency programs between 2005 and 2015. Those who attempt to make their way back into medical residency after an extended leave or departure are generally referred to as re-entering residents, and all parties involved are faced with the daunting task of deciphering what really happened—and if something similar will happen again.

Download the full article below, for free.

Download the article

Published with permission from HCPro/Residency Program Alert. Also published on HCPro.

* About Residency Program Alert: Residency program managers in all specialties are challenged to effectively manage their programs as accrediting agencies focus on outcome measures, the core competencies, proper documentation, resident supervision, and program, faculty, and resident evaluation. Add to those responsibilities the challenge to prepare for site visits, develop budgets for your program, and mitigate legal risks. Residency Program Alert is the source you need to confidently meet these challenges. This monthly resource provides residency managers with essential tips, tools, and best practices from the most well-respected, in-the-trenches experts. Dr. Pedram Mizani, the AmeriClerkships’ Chief Clinical Officer, is a writer and contributors to Residency Program Alert.
10 Considerations when Handling Re-entering Residents 2017-12-20T14:44:06+00:00

Thought I Knew the Answers

2017-12-21T09:51:04+00:00

I vividly remember the excitement of passing USMLE Step 1 and conducting actual H&Ps, with real patients in a real U.S. hospital, as remarkably humbling and strangely euphoric. After I finished two years of basic sciences in Belize (Central America), I returned to the United States to start my 3rd year clinical clerkships at an Illinois hospital where my medical school had placed me. (This makes me an International Medical Graduate – IMG!)

I thought I knew every answer, until a friend of mine attending a more established medical school asked if I was completing my clerkships at a teaching hospital. Like an amateur, I replied: “Of course I am…I’m learning every day!”

But, I soon found out I was NOT placed at a teaching hospital; something I later learned was happening to thousands of international medical students like myself! My medical school, however, admitted to their colossal mistake and moved me to Atlanta, Georgia where I completed the remainder of my clerkships at an ACGME recognized teaching hospital with an onsite Family Medicine residency program. Later on, I returned to that Atlanta hospital’s residency program and proudly graduated as Chief of the Morehouse Family Medicine Residency Program.

Because of my own struggles, I’ve dedicated my life to helping IMGs succeed in U.S. healthcare. Every few weeks, I will share inspiring clinical experiences of my own past, and ofthree IMGs who decided to shape their own futures in the annual Match by joining AmeriClerkships Medical Society.

I invite you to click the links below, get inspired, become an AmeriClerkships Member, and start capturing the attention of residency admission committees with clinical experiences ranging from 100% inpatients, with residency program directors and residency teams, to outpatients with primary care providers.

I’ll be rooting for you,

Pedram Mizani, MD, Founder

###

A Postgraduate Subinternship Experience:
On May 5, 2015, Angela’s life was changed…

A Teaching Hospital Guarantee Experience:
On April 25, 2015, Divya wrote me saying…

An Outpatient Experience:
On April 15, 2015, Nadia inspired me with the following…

###

Thought I Knew the Answers 2017-12-21T09:51:04+00:00

Four Epic Traps to Avoid

2017-12-21T09:54:20+00:00

While you’re reviewing the innovative services offered by AmeriClerkships, here are four career traps you may just be finding yourself in (without realizing it!):

1. Your E-mail address.

If you’re using Earthlink, AOL, Hotmail, your local cable provider, or a company email domain with a long name, you could be inadvertently shooting yourself in the foot.

We rarely see AOL, Earthlink or Hotmail email addresses these days. If you’re still using yesterday’s email providers to represent yourself professionally, it could be sending a message that you’re not comfortable with new technology or you’re too set in your ways. Using your local cable provider or your 20 character company name’s default e-mail increases the chances of a typo leading to a bounced emails and missed connections.

Every student at Advanced Colleges of America uses, or has a secondary gmail.‍com. Because gmail is well-known for its ease of use, utility, and power, using gmail as your address is a smart move that also sends the message that “I’m up to date with the times!”

What comes before the ‘@’ sign deserves attention as well.

‘Family’ or ‘household’ or ‘joint’ emails such as ‘thejonesfamily@’, ‘johnandjamie@’, or ‘ourfamilyloveshouston@’ are not good e-mail addresses to use on your resume, or professionally for that matter. Professionals want to write directly to other professionals; requesting that they e-mail your spouse & kids when contacting you is just plain weird.

The best email address is “first name[dot]last name”, at gmail.‍com: john.jones@gmail.com.

If that’s taken, then: john.jones.2015@gmail.com.

You’re probably going to be using this e-mail address into 2015 anyway and starting now makes you seem ahead of the times. And who doesn’t want to work with a healthcare professional from the future?

2. You’re misusing your overqualifications.

Almost all of the students in Advanced Colleges of America are international physicians who are receiving training on how healthcare is practiced in the United States as Advanced Medical Assistants. Why would they succumb to a lesser title?

The answer is simple: no employer will consciously hire a “neurosurgeon” or a self-proclaimed “medical assistant” who hasn’t proven that they’re willing to swallow their ego and learn what a U.S. employer requires of them.

This is what I call the “Overqualified Syndrome”, whereby a perfectly intelligent and capable candidate sabotages their future by sitting idle and not retraining for a less intense transitional career in order to get ahead. Now some employers offer “on the job training”, so you may not need to go back to school, but those are exceptions. Even residency programs will require that you perform as of day one, just like any other employer would. So if your time is valuable to you, then you should think about getting re-educated in a related field (like our International Medical Graduates do by using Advanced Medical Assisting to get a foothold in U.S. healthcare).

Which brings me to the next term I’ve coined during my spare time: the “Underqualified Overqualified Syndrome”. This is an overqualified applicant who applies to less intense healthcare jobs in the U.S., based on having held more advanced jobs abroad.

A good example is a foreign physician applying for a medical assisting position in the U.S., not even knowing what different color-top vacutainers are used for.

Let me ask you this: “Will the President of General Motors make a great car salesman?”  Why not? they’re both selling cars, aren’t they?

3. Your curriculum vitae misses the point, and you knowingly use it anyways.

Print out your curriculum vitae. Tear it in half and hand either piece to someone who is not in healthcare. Can they tell you with ease, what you want to do next in life?

For too many, the answer is no. The reason is that in your curriculum vitae, you’re telling the reader about things that that they can’t possibly prove, such as being a team player, trustworthy, positive, or a multitasker, and you may even have your marital status mentioned too!

You know what I look for in a curriculum vitae? Does this person “have the experience to do a good job?”, “provide an asset or a liability to our clinic?”, “show commitment, or bounced from job to job?”, and “have a bunch of grammatical and spelling errors?”  That last one is my biggest pet peeve.

Obviously, given that you spend all the time with yourself, its completely obvious to you what you’re looking for, but a stranger does not. And, chances are, your curriculum vitae will be read by a stranger, so make it easy for them to like you.

Show everyone, at the top of your curriculum vitae what job you’re looking for (first sentence), and why you’re the best fit for it (second sentence). No need to name all of your subjective attributes or marital status, just plain professional facts. A “to-the-point” approach shows that you’ve worked out all the kinks in your mind, and can form a solution to a problem quickly (maybe in 2 sentences).

4. You’re not speaking with one employer a day.

The internet is awesome: it delivers us news, movies, Yelp, reviews, and of course, acmedical.org!

Therefore “bravo!” for the internet.

But here’s the truth — the internet is not going to read your curriculum vitae; it will be read by humans who hire other humans. An employer.

So ask yourself: did you try to speak with an employer today? Have you called your former classmates? Returned the call from the clinic that perhaps you’re only mildly interested in? Have you taken a former colleague to lunch? Did you call back the Advanced Colleges of America representative you’ve spoken to six months ago?

It’s absolutely vital, while you’re seeking, qualifying, and selecting the healthcare program at Advanced Colleges of America that best fits you, that you realize that a part of becoming successful is to learn how an employer thinks, so you can fulfill what’s on their minds, and ultimately get hired and continue to build your curriculum vitae.

When it comes to competing for that perfect healthcare job, you need to exercise by “speaking with an employer” every day.

Put these tips to work, and you’ll get 4 steps closer to capturing success right at your fingertips.

Four Epic Traps to Avoid 2017-12-21T09:54:20+00:00

Additional Required Documents for Postgraduate Subinternship (PGSI) Processing

2018-01-11T23:54:45+00:00

In addition to the 4 phases in Steps to Clinicals, the following are additional requirements for Larkin processing and approval prior to the start of your Postgraduate Subinternships. Your timely cooperation in fulfilling the additional requirements for document processing at GMEs is not only appreciated, but also required at least 30 days prior to your established Postgraduate Subinternship (PGSI) Start Date(s). PGSI Clinical Blocks may not be changed, delayed or cancelled.

  1. All requirements in Steps to Clinicals page.
  2. Proof of Good Health: A general health check-up by a licensed physician done within the last 12 months. Template provided upon enrollment through email titled “Annual Physical Template for Your Upcoming Clinicals”.
  3. Above “Immunizations” may not be waived. However please note that you will not have to submit any proof of immunizations for Larkin if your Proof of Good Health from your licensed physician completely follows Template A.
  4. Influenza (Flu Shot): Seasonal immunization requirement during the months of September to March, must document vaccination for the appropriate flu season
  5. Attendance to the U.S. Clinical Experience Orientation (*Part 4 of 5, below): Required ONLY if you are a non-U.S. citizen or permanent resident traveling into the United States for your clinicals
  6. Attendance in Postgraduate Subinternship Orientation (*Part 5 of 5, below)
Additional Required Documents for Postgraduate Subinternship (PGSI) Processing 2018-01-11T23:54:45+00:00

Payment Plans

2017-11-30T18:11:19+00:00

AmeriClerkships accepts checks, direct electronic funds transfer and all major credit cards.* In addition, members may benefit from the following FIVE convenient payment plans (or a CUSTOM plan) that we have established as financial assistance for you below:**

OPTION ONE: 2 payment plan, no fees, min. 4 weeks

Payment #1: Membership fee plus 10% of clinical cost, due on day of first invoice

Payment #2: Avoid fees* and pay balance in full within 7 days of first payment

OPTION TWO: 2 payment plan, 6% installment fee, min. 4 weeks, excludes FASTart 1

Payment #1: Membership fee plus 10% of clinical cost, due on day of first invoice

Payment #2: Remaining 90% balance paid in full within 21 days of first invoice

OPTION THREE: 3 payment plan, 8% installment fee, min 8 weeks, excludes FASTart 1

Payment #1: Membership fee plus 10% of clinical cost, due on day of first invoice

Payment #2: 45% of remaining balance paid within 21 days of first invoice

Payment #3: 45% of remaining balance paid within 35 days of first invoice

OPTION FOUR: 4 payment plan, 10% installment fee, min 16 weeks, excludes FASTart 1

Payment #1: Membership fee plus 10% of clinical cost, due on day of first invoice

Payment #2: 30% of remaining balance paid within 21 days of first invoice

Payment #3: 30% of remaining balance paid within 35 days of first invoice

Payment #4: 30% of remaining balance paid within 7 days of start of clinical block #1

OPTION FIVE: Block by Block, 12% installment fee, excludes FASTart 1

Pay for each upcoming clinical block-by-clinical block, so long as the payment for that clinical block is made by no later than 2 weeks prior to the minimum number of days required for processing. So if the minimum processing time for a particular clinical block is 7 days, payment will be due 3 weeks prior to estimated start date; if minimum processing time is 84 days (12 weeks), payment will be due 14 weeks prior to estimated start date. The benefits of this option is that the start date will be reserved for you, so no one else can take your start date. To qualify for this Option Five, a 10% deposit + all installment and/or other non-clinical fees must be paid at the time of initial enrollment.

CUSTOM: Variable duration and fees, min. 4 weeks

Scenarios #1: Requiring a Letter of Enrollment: Members requiring supporting documents evidencing tentative enrollment into AMS and specific clinical sites are considered “Conditionally Enrolled”. We will help you select the clinical sites which will best suit your situation, and established two dates up-front: 1) Initial Enrollment Date (1st payment of Membership fee + $1000 deposit*** + all applicable courier service fees), and 2) Balance Due Date (typically 7 days after an official decision making date i.e. visa interview, or meeting with a school official). A ‘Conditional Letter of Enrollment’ is typically generated within 30 days of Initial Enrollment Date. A full ‘Letter of Enrollment’ (word ‘Conditional’ removed) is issued if already Fully Enrolled Certified (FEC) with AmeriClerkships. To avoid late fees and preserve the integrity of selected clinical blocks, any balances owed must be paid on/before Balance Due Date.

Scenario #2: Price protection against rapidly increasing clinical site fees on ‘Limited Availability’ clinical features such as VERIFIED: International medical students typically sign up to complete their entire final year clerkships up to 2 years ahead of time with AmeriClerkships mainly for 3 reasons: 1) Lock in your clinical selections without having to worry about fee hikes (i.e. since June 2016, the weekly fees of nearly 50% of clinical sites have increased by 100% or more mainly due to U.S. medical schools now paying up for clerkships), and 2) Financial incentives offered by AmeriClerkships, and 3) Compliance with certain U.S. medical residency requirements & hard-set timelines (i.e. having 4 strong and recent U.S. Letters of Recommendation from 4 to 6 months of recent U.S. clinical clerkships uploaded and approved by ECFMG by no later than September 15th of the year prior to residency start). We will help you select the clinical sites which will best suit your situation, and established two dates up-front: 1) Initial Enrollment Date (1st payment of Membership + 10% of total invoice amount), and 2) Balance Due Date (depends on your specific payment plan arrangement).

* A fee of $39/month will be assessed for all late payments.

** Please speak with your Residency Enrollment Strategist for a customized payment structure if you enroll less than 35 days before the start date of Clinical Block 1.

*** Please note that cancellations may be costly, and are highly discouraged. $1000 deposit in Scenario #1 is only refundable if supported by an official U.S. visa or applicable institutional rejection letter). Please review the AmeriClerkships Legal Notices, paying particular attention to the “General Refund Policy” for more details.

Payment Plans 2017-11-30T18:11:19+00:00

State Medical Licensure Policy Forum

2017-01-13T06:53:41+00:00

This public forum displays a summary of clerkship verification requirements for “initial licensure”, categorized by states. It is a must read for any International Medical Graduate looking ahead to licensure. If you don’t see your questions answered, contact us directly at 949-417-8980 to speak with a Residency Enrollment Strategist!

State Medical Licensure Policy Forum

State Medical Licensure Policy Forum 2017-01-13T06:53:41+00:00

Members-Only Webinars & Workshops

2017-04-20T16:36:15+00:00

Click below to select from our catalog of training and informational webinars. Access to each training will vary on your membership type, so please read the training description or contact webinars@americlerkships.org with any questions before registering!

Members-Only Webinars & Workshops Catalog

Members-Only Webinars & Workshops 2017-04-20T16:36:15+00:00

What to Expect During U.S. Clinical Experiences

2018-01-19T00:43:10+00:00

U.S. Clinical Experiences (USCE) at AmeriClerkships Medical Society (AMS) are reserved for active members (either medical students during their vacation times visiting the U.S., or medical graduates in between graduation and start of residency) who are looking to do good for the community at large as clinical volunteers, or are looking to strengthen their commitment to a particular field of medicine by securing letters of recommendation or to improve their chances of securing U.S. residencies. AMS members completing a USCE are not expecting a medical institution to issue credit for the clinicals they just completed (i.e. not for-credit), nor shall their supervising physician require such members to do anything that could be interpreted as the practice of medicine without a license (which is different for each state; simply Google search “practicing medicine without a license in [type in state of your USCE]”  before you begin your USCE).

Please note that:

  • All AMS Certified USCE are insured with professional liability insurance ($1/$3 million), supervised by AMS affiliated U.S. licensed physicians, and set up so that AMS members can see how their licensed supervisors practice medicine in the United States (instead of AMS members being the ones who practice medicine), AND;
  • Conducting USCE as volunteers does not forfeit your rights to post-clinical evaluations or soliciting letters of recommendation by your supervising physicians, AND;
  • There are several U.S. jurisdictions which have limitations placed on visiting rotations by medical students attending non-U.S. accredited Medical Institutions, and medical residents crossing state borders for practice of medicine, and it is every medical professional’s (medical student, graduate, resident or doctor) responsibility to remain in compliance with State Medical Board (SMB) rules & regulations for clerkships and future medical licensure. Furthermore, each AMS member is responsible for securing any needed documents from AMS in order to share with his/her medical institution for permissions or credits, and to allow the medical institution to obtain any necessary permissions from individual SMB (since SMBs will only work with Students or Medical Institution for school approvals & Clinical authorizations, and not AMS) prior to any start of clinicals with AMS. Enrolling with AMS does not alleviate an AMS member’s obligations and responsibilities to remain in full compliance with any state medical board and their medical institution’s policies. Please click here for more details.

Prior to the Start of Your USCE

Begin familiarizing yourself with the medical specialty that you’re assigned to by clicking here. Make sure that you receive your welcome package (mailed to a U.S. address you provide us; email your NCC if you haven’t received it by week prior to your start), which amongst other items will contain your specially sized AmeriClerkships embroidered short lab coat; wear this lab coat and dress business formal at all times during your clinical blocks unless instructed otherwise by your attending. The clinical block(s) you enrolled in will become fully approved and confirmed again once you become Fully Enrolled Certified (FEC). This is also the time that your AMS National Clinical Coordinator (NCC) will contact and introduce him/herself to you as he/she is responsible for the implementation of what you enrolled in with AMS (as outlined in your invoice), and to start you on time. Your NCC is also responsible for emailing (or calling in) your final confirmation to you at the “time of highest confidence“, meaning the time when to the best judgment of your NCC, your clinical location has the least likelihood of changing – which could be as late as the Friday before you begin.  Your confirmation email will contain the name and contact information about your attending, where and when to show up, and any other information that is unique to that site.  You can also view your individually confirmed clinical blocks online via MyClinicals (requires Last Name & Confirmation Number), and search surrounding points of interest (i.e. shopping, airports, rental cars, rental apartments, etc). Lastly but not least, make sure that you have viewed the AmeriClerkships orientation webinar.

Can changes occur? Possibly; your NCC will discuss unusual situations and all options with you in case of an unexpected emergency. But not to worry, as your AMS team is in most cases prepared, and typically has back-up clinical sites for most members. Possible unforeseen changes are also the reason why your NCC wait as long as we can to send out final confirmations (i.e. “time of highest confidence”, such as the Friday before you begin). If a change is initiated by you, then we will do our best to accommodate, but can not guarantee that we will be able to change your original scheduled clinical block(s) since all clinical blocks are scheduled sequentially, so a change made by you will affect future scheduled members at those same clinical sites. For AMS policy on changes, please click here and search for “Changes”.

The Start of Your First USCE Week

Follow the instructions on your confirmation email about when, where and what time to start your first day. Attending physicians are reasonable, but you must make it easy for them to see your commitment to your scheduled clinical block. Start with an open mind, and let your attending know that you’d like to see and experience EVERYTHING that this clinical block has to offer, including late night admissions and multiple hospital visits. Your first location may not be the same location as your future meetings with your attending. Each physician is different, but he/she will most likely quickly evaluate your ability to function within that clinical setting by having you follow them with little to no responsibilities during the first few days. The quicker you learn and adapt, the higher the physician’s expectation of you will be. Don’t ever be late, and always have your own transportation. If you’re visiting the U.S. from abroad, then secure your international drivers license so that you don’t miss out on any clinical experience opportunity, such as witnessing late night admissions or visiting multiple clinical sites/hospitals across town where public transportation is unavailable or unsafe or time consuming. Do not ask for a letter of recommendation until you have seen your clinical evaluation in your final week; otherwise you may risk upsetting the attending and making him/her feel like you’re using them for a recommendation letter, instead of obtaining the clinical experience to show your commitment for that specialty. Again, please review the AmeriClerkships orientation webinar for more details.

During Your USCE

Although each clinical experience is unique, the following is an outline of what our volunteer members can expect to experience, and be encouraged to master during each USCE clinical block:

  1. Professional Qualities and Adaptability: integrity, tolerance, confidentiality, punctuality, reliability, teachability/learnability, bilateral acculturation (accepting U.S., as well as incorporating home culture), initiative, participation, teamwork, receptivity to feedback, mindfulness, dedication;
  2. U.S. Medical Knowledge: basic medical sciences, clinical sciences, access to medical education resources;
  3. Familiarity with U.S. Healthcare System: U.S. culture, HIPAA, insurance, formulary, medico-legal, interdisciplinary healthcare system;
  4. Clinical Skills: Medical Histories
    1. Example of Activity: initially broad inquiries followed by specifics as indicated by Chief Complaint (CC) and History of Present Illness (HPI); rephrase patient responses or offer similes to clarify inadequate answers; sequentially question associated symptoms and pursuit of associations which may not be intuitive; thoroughly explore all risk factors; selectively use of followup questions with deeper probing of critical information; clearly organize patterns of questions from general to specific. THEREFORE with your supervisor in the room and with a patient’s permission you can speak with the patient and write notes (not in patient chart), but you can not conduct a physical exam.
    2. Note: You may discuss findings from the supervised patient encounter with the physician and discuss differentials, but you must never be the one who conducts any physical exams as this is the job of a licensed professional. A physical examination is defined as an evaluation of the body and its functions using inspection, palpation (feeling with the hands), percussion (tapping with the fingers), and auscultation (listening). A complete health assessment also includes gathering information about a person’s medical history and lifestyle, doing laboratory tests, and screening for disease.
  5. Communication Skills: written and spoken English proficiency; patients and families (Strong: Consistently confirms that understanding is clear by repetition, soliciting questions; explains any medical terminology used; always respectful in addressing; genuine effort to understand and respect diverse beliefs and attitudes); with colleagues, nursing and ancillary staff;
  6. Information Technology Skills: electronic medical records, information retrieval (clinical data and reference material);
  7. Presentation Skills: patient and educational presentations, case updates, rounds, discharge, admission,
  8. Included Comments: observations or information that the physician believes would be of value to those who may be assessing this applicant as a potential residency candidate.

At the End of Your USCE

Unless another type of clinical evaluation has been provided to us by you or your medical institution, AMS will email a Post-clinical evaluation to your supervising attending physician that is based on the 6 ACGME Core Competencies. Please click here to familiarize yourself with this helpful table.

Most-all AMS members participate in USCE in order to experience how care is provided to patients in the United States, and to hopefully secure a letter of recommendation that documents their overall performance on the above mentioned competencies. In order to ask your mentor to willingly recommend you to residency, make sure that you do as follows:

  • Follow the above recommendations
  • Earn your LOR, meaning you should put all that you have in performing genuinely and to the best of your abilities
  • Midway through your USCE block: print this page, and ask the attending to give you verbal feedback on the above competencies
  • Toward the end of your 3rd week: ask the attending if its okay for them to complete the AMS clinical evaluation of you in person, next week some time
  • Last week of your USCE: if your attending evaluated you well on all competencies, then ask them if they can support you in your pursuit of residency by writing you a letter of recommendation. Give them a copy of your AMS prepared CV, and ask them to email you a draft copy of the LOR so that you can have your Advisors at AMS analyze it for you (Letter of Recommendation Analysis). Ask if they’d like a copy of your LORA, and if so, then share what AMS provides you with the attending. If not then email the AMS recommendations back to the attending.

Please contact us with any questions.

What to Expect During U.S. Clinical Experiences 2018-01-19T00:43:10+00:00