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Frequently Asked Questions & Answers2019-02-11T04:26:14-07:00
6 Payment Plan Options2019-02-04T15:26:15-07:00

AmeriClerkships accepts checks, direct electronic funds transfer and all major credit cards.* In addition, members may benefit from the following SIX convenient payment plans (or a CUSTOM plan) that we have established as financial assistance for you below:**

Option One

2 payment plan, no fees, min. 4 weeks

Payment #1: Membership fee plus 10% of clinical cost, due on day of first invoice

Payment #2: Avoid fees* and pay balance in full within 7 days of first payment

Option Two

2 payment plan, 6% installment fee, min. 4 weeks, excludes FASTart 1

Payment #1: Membership fee plus 10% of clinical cost, due on day of first invoice

Payment #2: Remaining 90% balance paid in full within 21 days of first invoice

Option Three

3 payment plan, 8% installment fee, min 8 weeks, excludes FASTart 1

Payment #1: Membership fee plus 10% of clinical cost, due on day of first invoice

Payment #2: 45% of remaining balance paid within 21 days of first invoice

Payment #3: 45% of remaining balance paid within 35 days of first invoice

Option Four

4 payment plan, 10% installment fee, min 16 weeks, excludes FASTart 1

Payment #1: Membership fee plus 10% of clinical cost, due on day of first invoice

Payment #2: 30% of remaining balance paid within 21 days of first invoice

Payment #3: 30% of remaining balance paid within 35 days of first invoice

Payment #4: 30% of remaining balance paid within 7 days of start of clinical block #1

Option Five

Block by Block, 12% installment fee, excludes FASTart 1

Pay for each upcoming clinical block-by-clinical block, so long as the payment for that clinical block is made by no later than 2 weeks prior to the minimum number of days required for processing. So if the minimum processing time for a particular clinical block is 7 days, payment will be due 3 weeks prior to estimated start date; if minimum processing time is 84 days (12 weeks), payment will be due 14 weeks prior to estimated start date. The benefits of this option is that the start date will be reserved for you, so no one else can take your start date. To qualify for this Option Five, a 10% deposit + all installment and/or other non-clinical fees must be paid at the time of initial enrollment.

Custom

Variable duration and fees, min. 4 weeks

Scenarios #1: Requiring a Letter of Enrollment: Members requiring supporting documents evidencing tentative enrollment into AMS and specific clinical sites are considered “Conditionally Enrolled”. We will help you select the clinical sites which will best suit your situation, and established two dates up-front: 1) Initial Enrollment Date (1st payment of Membership fee + $1000 deposit*** + all applicable courier service fees), and 2) Balance Due Date (typically 7 days after an official decision making date i.e. visa interview, or meeting with a school official). A ‘Conditional Letter of Enrollment’ is typically generated within 30 days of Initial Enrollment Date. A full ‘Letter of Enrollment’ (word ‘Conditional’ removed) is issued if already Fully Enrolled Certified (FEC) with AmeriClerkships. To avoid late fees and preserve the integrity of selected clinical blocks, any balances owed must be paid on/before Balance Due Date.

Scenario #2: Price protection against rapidly increasing clinical site fees on ‘Limited Availability’ clinical features such as VERIFIED: International medical students typically sign up to complete their entire final year clerkships up to 2 years ahead of time with AmeriClerkships mainly for 3 reasons: 1) Lock in your clinical selections without having to worry about fee hikes (i.e. since June 2016, the weekly fees of nearly 50% of clinical sites have increased by 100% or more mainly due to U.S. medical schools now paying up for clerkships), and 2) Financial incentives offered by AmeriClerkships, and 3) Compliance with certain U.S. medical residency requirements & hard-set timelines (i.e. having 4 strong and recent U.S. Letters of Recommendation from 4 to 6 months of recent U.S. clinical clerkships uploaded and approved by ECFMG by no later than September 15th of the year prior to residency start). We will help you select the clinical sites which will best suit your situation, and established two dates up-front: 1) Initial Enrollment Date (1st payment of Membership + 10% of total invoice amount), and 2) Balance Due Date (depends on your specific payment plan arrangement).

* A fee of $39/month will be assessed for all late payments.

** Please speak with your Residency Enrollment Strategist for a customized payment structure if you enroll less than 35 days before the start date of Clinical Block 1.

*** Please note that cancellations may be costly, and are highly discouraged. $1000 deposit in Scenario #1 is only refundable if supported by an official U.S. visa or applicable institutional rejection letter). Please review the AmeriClerkships Legal Notices, paying particular attention to the “General Policies for Changes & Cancellations” for more details.

Can I become an AmeriClerkships Member without enrolling in clinicals?2019-04-06T08:18:19-07:00

Yes you can! Although highly recommended to gain U.S. clinical experiences in at least 4 AmeriClerkships affiliated Clinical Site, you do not need to co-enroll in our U.S. clinicals in order to become an AmeriClerkships Member. Common reasons for Membership Only enrollments: active students who are obtaining their required U.S. clinical rotations through their schools; pre-meds who are unsure of their future career plans; medical graduates need to strategize the best approach to their residency-prep and entry after speaking with Dr. Mizani; inability to leave their state of residence where medical graduates without U.S. medical residency are not permitted to have any patient contact, OR inability to leave work where their employer sponsors their visa, but they still want to do everything possible on paper and in-person during residency interviews despite these limitations.

Does AmeriClerkships work with my sponsoring institution (or government)?2019-02-04T15:18:02-07:00

Please contact accounting@acmedical.org to confirm a working relationship with your sponsoring institution, make financial arrangements and provide you with a clearance.

Does my visa for research allow me to do rotations?2019-02-04T15:26:47-07:00

It depends on the type of visa you have, what type of ‘rotation’, what type of ‘research’ and if on a J1 for research, then will your ’employer’ (the institution who sponsored your J1 visa for research) will provide you with enough uninterrupted time so that you can obtain US clinical experience while also working at that facility. If you are in the United States on an F1 (i.e. for learning English language, or USMLE studies), then it may not be legal for you to also engage in a for-credit type clinical clerkship or elective.

Does my visa status allow me access into the United States for rotations?2019-02-04T15:27:18-07:00

Each visa status carries a different set of requirements; if you are unsure of your status and ability to come to the United States, the best and only way to be 100% confident is to consult an immigration attorney.

Get $100 credit for becoming FEC in 7 days2019-02-04T15:25:43-07:00

Don’t waste any time becoming FEC: complete the 4 phases below within 7 days of your initial payment for memberships and clinicals, and we will issue you a $100 AmeriClerkships credit which can be applied to your balance due, or most AmeriClerkships products & services (see your Enrollment Agreement for details).

Did you become FEC in 7? Click here to start a support case, and select “My $100 credit for becoming FEC in 7 days” under ‘This case is about’.

How can AmeriClerkships help me secure a U.S. visa?2019-02-04T15:28:02-07:00

While AmeriClerkships does not sponsor visas, our company can issue a document called a Letter of Enrollment to present during a vista interview. This document will outline the nature of the clinical rotations you will be completing through our company, detailing items like the location, start and end dates, addresses and other qualifying information. This will serves as proof of your enrollment and can assist with showing the reason for your visit to the United States. This Letter of Enrollment does not contain any legal advice and any AMS Member who has any legal questions or who desires legal advice should contact a qualified attorney.

How do I become an AmeriClerkships Member?2019-02-04T15:23:17-07:00

Click to join the global community of over 4,000 pre-meds, medical students & graduates from 250 medical schools (from both US and abroad), united by a commitment to Match into U.S. medical residencies. Our membership benefits will help you prevent catastrophic setbacks when applying to U.S. medical residencies.

Otherwise click the  icon for live chat or contact us and ask any questions.

How do I search for U.S. clinicals while a Member?2019-02-04T15:18:31-07:00

If you decide to co-enroll in clinicals during your active AmeriClerkships Membership, you may begin by visiting MyClinicals: ‘The World’s Largest Booking Site for U.S. Clinical Clerkships”. Note that some clinical sites and hospitals may require up to 90 days to process and approve you, so please plan accordingly.

Is Fully Enrolled Certified (FEC) the same as Fully Enrolled & Credentialed (FEC)?2019-02-04T11:46:10-07:00

Yes it is. We only changed ‘Certified’ to ‘Credentialed’ so members can relate to the process easier.

Letter of Enrollment: How do I obtain a Letter of Enrollment?2019-02-04T15:27:43-07:00

Members that are Fully Enrolled Certified no later than four days prior to their earliest “Estimated Start Date” are eligible for a Letter of Enrollment. LOEs are issued on AMS letterhead and are intended for the sole purpose of establishing the services provided to a member by AMS. LOE is not intended to provide any legal advice or to provide warranties or guarantees of any kind – neither implied nor in writing – regarding anything beyond the scope of their enrollment agreement and the products and services, which a member has paid for and enrolled in. Issuance of LOE may be delayed (or, rarely, declined) at the discretion of AMS; factors which may cause delays include missing required documents for enrolled clinicals, not being in financial good standing, and performance or behavioral issues. Usage of an LOE will not guarantee anyone entrance into the United States. AMS is not an educational entity therefore its LOE are not meant to be used for securing visas, credits, or to show that AMS is sponsoring a member’s stay in the U.S. If AMS has agreed to facilitate the issuance of an LOE on a supervising physician’s clinic letterhead and signed by that same physician, it will do so using a standard, non-revisable language template for the type of Clinical block a member has enrolled in. However, securing an LOE on clinic letterhead is quite time consuming. It may take AMS up to 3 days prior to a member’s scheduled start date to secure this LOE (but typically much sooner). A supervising physician has the right to change his/her mind for signing an LOE on his/her clinic letterhead at any time. Furthermore, member must agree that AMS or the supervising physician’s inability to provide an LOE on that supervisor’s letterhead may not be used as the basis for cancellation or switching of a clinical site, and in such event, member agrees to the standard protocol of using an LOE on AMS letterhead instead.

Letter of Enrollment: I’m a medical student, do I need a Letter of Enrollment or a Letter of Good Standing from my school for my rotations?2019-02-04T15:26:29-07:00

The answer is; it depends, both on your vista status and the type of experience you are completing in the United States.

For example, a for-credit rotation (the categories of which are defined here) allows students to have expanded responsibilities with their school’s guidance, which must be reflected in the Letter of Enrollment (LOE) and the conversation during your border crossing. For-credit clinicals have a more limited inventory, are offered in fewer states than “Not for Credit”, are under more strict supervisory policies by the U.S. Department of State, and various medical boards (since a for-credit clinical elective may involve the student practicing to be a doctor, also known as practicing limited medicine without a license). Visiting students signing up for this type of rotation should ask for a letter of sponsorship from their medical school documenting as much details and their approval of all clinical elective(s) taking place in the United States, and that they are in good standing with that medical school.

For rotations that are not for credit, it means that your medical school has no involvement in this rotation as this is not a part of your curriculum, is being done during your vacation time (not during the regular semester) and thus is categorized as a volunteer activity. In this type of rotation, you must not portray yourself as a medical student doing for-credit clinicals (i.e. introducing yourself as a 3rd or 4th or 5th year medical student, or sharing your diagnostic opinions, etc.) Not for credit type of CB is not work, unpaid, and will not go on your transcript, therefore most state medical boards do not govern this type of experience, and do not care if your medical school is approved in that state. This also means you are coming to the U.S. to watch medicine be practiced (and not be the one who practices medicine, such as limited practice by medical students from properly processed and pre-approved medical students in for-credit clinicals), therefore categorized by the Department of State (U.S. border control and embassies) as observational. If this is the type of clinical rotations you are signed up for, then make sure that you do not confuse the border patrol officers by telling them you are coming to do clinical electives, as that would be a misrepresentation of your medical school’s involvement.

You are required to immediately disclose the for-credit or not-for-credit status of clinical rotations with AmeriClerkships prior to enrollment, by way of completing the AmeriClerkships Clinical Authorization Letter.

Letter of Enrollment: What happens if my visa is denied even with the Letter of Enrollment?2019-02-04T15:27:30-07:00

In that case, members can eligible for a partial refund. Our policy is as follows:

Member is solely responsible for securing a visa for entry into the U.S. However in the case that a Member is unable to secure a visa, AMS may be able to evaluate for partial refund based on the “Cancellation Policy for Conditionally Enrolled Members Needing a Letter of Enrollment (such as those needing a US visa or requiring sponsoring institution or school approval)” below. An uncertain, pending or expiring U.S. immigration status will trigger AMS to push all pending or affected Clinical Block(s) to the end of Member’s Membership period. AMS Member will be responsible for all rescheduling fees, including possible renewal of an AMS membership, and Member acknowledges that he/she may not be entitled to any credit for any scheduled but incomplete Clinical Blocks.

Credit and/or Refund for U.S. Visa or Entry Rejection: In most cases, Members who are initially rejected U.S. visa or U.S. entry may be granted U.S. visa or U.S. entry after consulting with an immigration attorney and making appropriate adjustments (over a reasonable timeframe) to what may have caused their initial rejection in the first place (i.e. unemployment, lack of residence in a foreign country with no intention of abandoning, missing documents, unintentional misrepresentation of reason for U.S. entry at the border, etc.); however in certain unfortunate cases, subsequent attempts at U.S. visa or entry may continue to be unsuccessful. Therefore the Member agrees to the following remedies: 1) After the FIRST (1st) ‘U.S. visa rejection’, or ANY ‘U.S. border entry denial’: Member may opt for ‘AMS Credit on File’ for payments made towards AMS products and Membership benefits not yet started, minus 10% Processing Fee and any other applicable change fees, valid or transferable for up to 3 years (please read ‘Financial Credits Issued by AMS (Credit on File)‘ below), OR 2) After the SECOND (2nd) ‘U.S. visa rejection’: Member may qualify for a FULL REFUND of the monies paid by the Member for the AMS products and Membership benefits not yet started, minus $149 processing fee, in the original form of payment. To take advantage of any of the above 3 options, Member agrees to create a case at acmedical.org/support and upload the applicable supporting documents (i.e. U.S. Department of State or U.S. Consulate issued visa denial/rejection letter(s) AND “Appointment Confirmation(s)” for each individual visa rejection, OR proof of U.S. entry denial at the U.S. border). It is up to the Member to prove that the U.S. visa rejections and/or entry denial(s) occurred after the date of Member’s made any payments towards the products and Membership benefits not yet started. Attendance in the AMS online “U.S. Clinical Experience Orientation” (which explains the scope of Member’s U.S. clinical experience), and acknowledgment of receipt of the official AMS LOE are required for any credit or refund considerations. Although much quicker, processing may take 30 to 90 days to complete, depending on the complexity of a case.

Letter of Enrollment: What is the minimum requirement to get my Letter of Enrollment?2019-02-04T11:46:11-07:00

Only when you become FEC can AmeriClerkships attest that you meet all qualifications to start your clinicals. Therefore you must submit and receive approval for every document required in order for AmeriClerkships to issue your Letter of Enrollment (LOE).

Letter of Enrollment: Why does your Letter of Enrollment say observership? I want hands-on experiences before residency.2019-02-04T15:27:05-07:00

There is NOT a unified definition for the terms US clinical observership or hands-on or externship or rotations or green-book, as each industry or organization defines it to cater to their own needs. Most hospitals define observership as you not coming in contact with patients (i.e. examining), but they may allow speaking with patients (i.e. taking a history on your own stationary). Some hospitals who only allow observerships, may offer read-only access to their EMR systems, but that can vary. The same goes for the term ‘hands-on’ since that implies the actual practice of medicine by state medical boards, but to most medical students and graduates it simply means the ability to take histories and assist with exams. For the purposes of crossing the US border only, we use the term ‘observational’ to describe your clinical rotations.

Required Documents & becoming Fully Enrolled & Credentialed (FEC)2019-02-04T15:26:00-07:00

Becoming Fully Enrolled & Credentialed (FEC) is a prerequisite for participation in AmeriClerkships clinicals. The time required to complete this process depends on minimum time required by hospitals for processing (varies from 1 to 90 days), and how rapidly you complete the FOUR phases to becoming FEC:

  1. Required Documents #1: Digitally Upload (documents that can be uploaded as is)
  2. Required Documents #2: Officially Notarize by Notarycam.com (documents which have a much greater legal significance, so must be verified and submitted by an authorized 3rd party)
  3. Required Documents #3: Possible Additional Requirements (typically required in order to meet hospital requirements so that you can be processed and be able to legally enter their facilities)
  4. Required Documents #4: Orientations & Quizzes (done online)

Learn about each by selecting a drop down below.

Required Documents #1: Digitally Upload2019-02-04T15:25:23-07:00

The items below must be scanned and uploaded using your personal AmeriClerkships Document Upload Portal (which will be provided to you immediately after your enrollment).

Your Resume; this will also serve as your AmeriClerkships Application.

Click here for your nearest FedEx Office passport picture office.

Personal health insurance must be issued in the name of the individual enrolling with AmeriClerkships, meet our minimum health insurance requirements. You may either:

  1. Take a photo of the front and back of your valid U.S. health insurance card or policy, OR
  2. Get an instant quote and purchase travel insurance online:
    1. Non-US residence: Click here (for pre-approved, select the following: ‘Worldwide, including U.S.’, and at least a ‘$500,000 Maximum’)
    2. US residents: Click here
    3. Canadian Citizens: Prior to leaving Canada: Call (401) 773-9345; after leaving Canada: Call TIC (800) 465-4279

The following may be documented by your primary care physician, or on clinic or hospital letterhead:

1. Tetanus: single dose within last 10 years OR positive tetanus toxin antibody titers OR download a waiver formAND

2. Hepatitis B: triple dose OR positive HBsAB titers OR download a waiver formAND

3. Varicella: single/double dose OR positive varicella antibody titers OR immunity by history of disease OR download a waiver formAND

4. Mumps & Measles & Rubella (MMR): single/double dose OR positive triple antibody titers to Mumps & Measles & Rubella, AND

6. (Only Required by Some Sites & Seasonal) Influenza (flu shot): some clinical sites require a single dose of a flu shot (U.S. strands) within last 12 months; ask your Residency Enrollment Specialist if this applies to you.

*PLEASE NOTE: Clinical sites may not accept vaccine waiver forms or may require additional health-related documentation. Please inquire with your residency enrollment strategist if this applies to you. Results must be valid for full duration of all clinical rotations.

Updated on March 15, 2018, as directed by the CDC:

  • Negative PPD skin test:
    • < 12 months: Do nothing more at this stage.
    • > 12 months: Need a negative IGRA blood assay.
  • Negative IGRA blood assay:
    • < 12 months: Do nothing more at this stage;
    • > 12 months: Need negative symptom screen annually;
    • If traveling in and out of the U.S. and entering healthcare facilities abroad (regardless of time from last negative IGRA): Must repeat negative symptom screen annually.
  • Positive PPD skin test + history of BCG (which means most likely from a country with higher TB prevalence): Need IGRA blood assay. If:
    • IGRA is negative: Do nothing more at this stage.
    • IGRA is positive: then follow directions below.
  • Positive PPD skin test (and no history of BCG) OR positive IGRA:
    • < 12 months: Need chest x-ray done in the U.S. ruling out TB. IF:
      • Chest x-ray < 24 months and read by a U.S. radiologist: Need a negative symptom screen < 12 months (do not repeat chest x-ray at the moment);
      • Chest x-ray < 24 months and read by a non-U.S. radiologist OR chest x-ray > 24 months: Need a negative symptom screen + chest x-ray done in the U.S. ruling out TB.
    • > 12 months: Need negative symptom screen + chest x-ray done in the U.S. ruling out TB, every 24 months.
  • Please note:
    • Current CDC guidelines are recommending to stop using PPD and minimize radiation exposure, by shifting to IGRA and symptom screening;
    • IGRA only needs to be documented once in a lifetime if negative that first time;
    • PPD and IGRA do not need to be repeated for AmeriClerkships, but each US healthcare facility may require repeat of ANY of the above depending on their policies, or additional testing per clinical site processing requirements, including (but not limited to) two-step PPD (which can take 14 to 30 days to complete) and chest x-ray done in the U.S.

Download the Clinical Authorization Letter (Medical Students, Externs, and Residents doing clinicals for credit, or requiring a Clinical Evaluation at the end to show proof to their school that such clinicals were completed), then scan and send back.

Required Documents #2: Officially Notarize by Notarycam.com2019-02-04T15:25:05-07:00

The authenticity of the following documents must be confirmed by a court commissioned “notary public” personnel, in English. Seals/signatures from your medical school are not sufficient replacements for notary (except school sealed transcripts – read below).

Electronically notarize these documents online at https://www.notarycam.com/americlerkships/.You must request for the digitally notarized documents to be sent directly from https://www.notarycam.com/americlerkships/to documents@acmedical.orgPLEASE NOTE: Electronically notarized documents sent by any sender other than notarycam.com will be rejected.

Please note the following:

  • We will accept an official school sealed transcript (original, not a copy) that is mailed directly from your medical school to AmeriClerkships, in lieu of a notarized copy of your transcript.
  • The cost of Notarycam is comparable to (if not cheaper than) the cost of in-person notary public. In-person notary can be as much as $10 to $30/document.
  • As for school seals on any other documents that need notary (i.e. copies of passports, visas, ECFMG Certificates, etc.) that will not be acceptable as notary.

Medical Students & Graduates (select any 1 of 3):

1. ECFMG Certificate, OR

2. Medical diploma from an IMED recognized school (and its official, notarized English translation, if the original is not in English), OR

3. Medical school transcript from an IMED recognized school (and its official, notarized English translation, if the original is not in English)

Pre-Health Students (select any 1 of 2):

1. Any undergraduate (or higher) degree with a minimum GPA of 2.6 from a college/university accredited by the US Department of EducationOR

2. Transcript from a college/university accredited by the US Department of Education indicating that you have successfully completed >100 units of didactic in preparation for an undergraduate (or higher) degree, with a minimum GPA of 2.6.

Select any 1 of 7; must not be expired, or expire during scheduled clinicals:

  1. U.S. or Canadian naturalization certificate with picture, OR
  2. U.S. or Canadian Passport picture and information page, OR
  3. U.S. Permanent Resident Card (Green Card; front and back), OR
  4. Non-U.S. Passport picture and information page from one of 36 Visa Waiver Program participating countries (max 12 week clinical enrollment per U.S. entry), OR
  5. U.S. Employment Authorization Card with picture, OR
  6. U.S. or Canadian government issued identification and birth certificate, OR
  7. Non-U.S. Passport, PLUS
    1. U.S. visa that is valid for the entire duration of clinicals, OR
    2. Expired F-1 visa with an I-20 extension that is valid for the entire duration of clinicals, OR
    3. Expired U.S. visa with Form I-94 or I-94A that is valid for the entire duration of clinicals.
Required Documents #3: Possible Additional Requirements2019-02-04T15:24:28-07:00

The above documents will fulfill the processing requirements of the majority of our clinical sites. However, certain hospitals policies may require additional documents to process your approval, some of which may take up to 4 weeks to fulfill (i.e. 12 panel Urine Drug Screen, Two Step PPD, health clearance by a physician, international background checks, etc.). Your timely cooperation in fulfilling any additional requirements for document processing is not only appreciated, but also required prior to any established deadlines. Any delays may cause a delay in your start date, and in extreme cases, possible loss of opportunity to rotate at that particular healthcare facility.

  1. Proof of Good Health: A general health check-up by a licensed physician done within the last 12 months. Template provided upon enrollment through email titled “Annual Physical Template for Your Upcoming Clinicals”.
  2. Above “Immunizations” may not be waived. However please note that you will not have to submit any proof of immunizations if your Proof of Good Health from your licensed physician completely follows Template A.
  3. Influenza (Flu Shot): Seasonal immunization requirement during the months of September to March, must document vaccination for the appropriate flu season
  4. Attendance to the U.S. Clinical Experience Orientation (*Part 4 of 5, below): Required ONLY if you are a non-U.S. citizen or permanent resident traveling into the United States for your clinicals
  5. Attendance in Postgraduate Subinternship Orientation (*Part 5 of 5, below)
Required Documents #4: Orientations & Quizzes2019-02-04T15:24:12-07:00

Online orientations are an excellent and cost effective way for you to get to know and interact with AmeriClerkships staff, and get personal attention to your particular scenario. Attendance and active participation in the following are required for you to become Fully Enrolled Certified. Please note:

  • Webinars are hosted on GoToTraining software platforms. Please familiarize yourself with the software before the webinar begins, and contact webinars@acmedical.org at least 30 minutes prior to your session with any technical concerns.
  • Be prepared to “dial-in” to a webinar, in case your internet connection is not strong enough to provide you audio access to the webinar. The dial-in instructions will be included in your registration confirmation email.
  • Part 4 and 5 orientations below are specialty webinars/orientations (demarcated by a ‘*‘), and only required of certain AmeriClerkships members to register and attend. Please open each toggle to see if they apply to you. A working computer microphone or phone audio is required for both orientations. Please ensure your microphone is working with the ‘Test Connection’ functionality contained in your webinar confirmation email.
  • Members who fail to attend a required webinar on time for any reason can make up the webinar at the next available date for no additional charge. However, if there no available dates before a member’s crossing of the US border or PGSI start date, members must pay a $150 fee to set up a private orientation with Dr. Mizani to fulfill their enrollment requirements. Technical issues are NOT acceptable grounds for missing a webinar, or lack of participation.
  1. Watch a brief HIPAA video tutorial (Free www.medscape.org account is required), THEN
  2. Click here to take a short quiz now (check your email for the password)

Attendance and active participation in this specialty webinar is required ONLY for non-US citizen or non-US permanent resident visitors who are in the process of entering the U.S. for AmeriClerkships clinical experience.

During a U.S. visa interview AND AGAIN when interviewed by the U.S. Border Patrol Officers upon entry into the United States, non-US citizen and non-US permanent resident visitors will be asked about their purpose of visit to the United States. In this 30-minute webinar, you will learn about what to expect during your upcoming U.S. clinical experience, in an effort to prevent any unintended misunderstanding or mischaracterization of your visit that could jeopardize your ability to attend the clinical experience.

To register for this specialty webinar please visit the US Clinical Experience Orientation registration page.

  • Enrolled in a Postgraduate Subinternship clinical block.
    • Affected members must register for the Postgraduate Subinternship Orientation.
    • This 30-minute session will prepare you for your Postgraduate Subinternship by providing you with the key factors of a successful Postgraduate Subinternship. We will be answering questions about what to expect, and what your supervisors will be expecting from you. This orientation session will help you to prepare you to have an excellent experience that will increase your chances of getting positive letters of recommendation from your supervising physician.

Attendance and active participation in this specialty webinar is required ONLY for any AmeriClerkships member who is enrolled in Postgraduate Subinternships (PGSI) clinical block(s).

This 30-minute interactive webinar will prepare you for your PGSI by providing you with the key factors to successfully navigate your way within U.S. Graduate Medical Education, and among active U.S. medical residency faculty, residents and even program directors. We will be answering questions about what to expect, and what your supervisors will be expecting from you. This orientation session will help you to prepare you to have an excellent experience that will increase your chances of getting positive letters of recommendation from residency program faculty.

To register for this specialty webinar please visit the Postgraduate Subinternship Orientation registration page.

Required Documents: Disclaimer2019-02-04T15:23:50-07:00

Members are responsible for ALL costs associated with securing and submitting ALL of the above required documents. All documents are required for Full Enrollment Certification (FEC) and must be submitted and approved no later than 14 days before your scheduled start date. Late document submission will incur additional fees, including a $199 FASTart1 expedited processing fee. Your supervising attending physician may have you accompany him/her to healthcare facilities that AmeriClerkships is unaware of. Please note that all U.S. healthcare facilities (i.e. hospitals, emergency rooms, surgical centers, clinics, etc.) are regulated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, hence unauthorized entry into such facilities may be deemed as a violation of HIPAA, carry civil penalties, be prosecutable as trespassing by such facilities, and a violation of the AmeriClerkships “ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY” (explained in your Enrollment Agreement). Therefore for everyone’s protection (including yours), AmeriClerkships members may only enter healthcare facilities that they have been expressly authorized to enter (documented in the FINAL CONFIRMATION email which is sent to members prior to the start of each clinical block). Approval by AmeriClerkships does not guarantee clearance by the U.S. Border Control or any other U.S. government agency.

What is AmeriClerkships “Commitment to Clarity”?2019-02-11T13:04:55-07:00

A Great Relationship Begins with Clarity and Setting Proper Expectations.

Please read this document carefully, and let us know how we may make your membership experience a more pleasant one. This statement of clarity is not meant to explain all the mutual commitments made by AmeriClerkships Medical Society and its members, and it does not replace or in any way alter the membership agreement signed by each member. Please click here for other terms and conditions.

  1. Objective of AmeriClerkships Medical Society (“AMS”): AMS is a membership-based organization that provides its members with health career development services to assist with refining and achieving their career objectives. AMS provides clinical learning experiences meant to improve knowledge and patient communication skills in real clinical sites. The goal of AMS is to empower each of its members to move confidently from highly-protected academic environments to the real world of U.S. medical residencies.
  2. Nature of Clinical Experiences: click here to learn about what do expect before, during and after your clinical block(s) with AmeriClerkships.
  3. Possible Change of Clinical Site & Locations: although every effort will be made to avoid changes, medicine’s urgent nature does at times require that we replace an unavailable supervising attending physician. We promise that if a change is required, that we will always notify you in advance, that its clinical features will be preserved (or upgraded free of charge), and the replacement Clinical Site will be within 50 miles of your originally approved Clinical Site.
  4. Transportation & Housing: physicians often visit multiple hospitals and clinics, 24 hours/day, 7 days/week. Therefore we strongly discourage your usage of public transportation. Also, we recommend that you book nightly hotels until you are certain of your schedule, and all locations visited with your supervisor during each clinical block. Do not enter into any long term leases otherwise.
  5. Academic Credit: AMS is not a teaching entity and does not offer credit. Unless a member is a student and his/her sponsor institution agrees to offer credit for clinicals (as evidenced by a Clinical Authorization Letter (CAL) completed and signed by the sponsoring institution), all clinicals are not-for-credit as AMS is not a party to the grant of academic credit, and any such grant is subject to the rules of the credit granting institution, in addition to all agreed AMS conditions.
  6. Definitions: AMS abides by the AMA Glossary of Program Information, the ACGME Glossary of Terms, as well as the following internal terms:
    1. Attending Physician (AP): a U.S. licensed physician who serves as a mentor, supervisor, and teacher.
    2. Teaching Hospital: a hospital listed in ACGMEAMA’s FREIDA (requires free AMA account), American Osteopathic Association, or one that serves as a clinical clerkship site for U.S. medical schools.
    3. Clinical Site (CS): an affiliated setting, supervised by an AP and designated by a number.
    4. Clinical Block (CB): a collection of clinical weeks/hours that a member enrolls in at a particular CS
    5. Core Specialties: Family, Internal, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Surgery, Psychiatry and Pediatrics.
    6. Premium Specialties: Any non-Core specialty
    7. Physician Status: an AP’s current position and possible influence within the medical education community.
    8. Clinical Feature: amount and type of hospital exposure (fees will vary; inpatient experience will be verified with each AP, if necessary):
      1. Program Director (PD): Clinical Sites that are supervised by residency PD’s, enabling Members to solicit for letters of recommendation from those PDs;
      2. Verified (V): An added layer of protection and processing, whereby Members will be processed at an AMS affiliated hospital or medical center, in addition to the physician they are assigned to;
      3. Teaching Hospital Guarantee (THG): opportunity for partial (<50%) teaching hospital exposure;
      4. Hospital Guarantee (HG): opportunity for partial (<50%) community hospital exposure;
      5. Inpatient (IP): opportunity for majority (>50%) HG or THG exposure;
      6. Hospitalist (HOSP): opportunity for primarily (~100%) HG or THG exposure;
      7. Community Healthcare Experience (CHE): primarily (~100%) outpatient exposure; inpatient unlikely.
      8. Postgraduate Subinternships (PGSI): Clinicals sanctioned by a Graduate Medical Education department, with AMS PGSI Members being able to become a part of existing medical residency teams, enabling them to attend residency didactics/conferences, to solicit for LORs on teaching hospital letterheads, and to be considered for a residency interview at that PGSI host institution.
  7. That they have read and understood the AMS policies (especially its cancellation policy) located here; as such they understand and agree that membership, non-clinical services (i.e., document revision, mock interviews, etc.) and clinicals are non-refundable, and that only minor changes may be accommodated to any Approved Clinical Block(s) (such as changes made to start/end dates, location and possibly specialty where available; fees may apply). Being a “no-show” at a scheduled clinical site without making formal and written arrangements with AmeriClerkships will not entitle you to rescheduling or any refunds.  Any clinical feature disputes (amount of inpatient exposure) will be thoroughly investigated by contacting the attending physician and the clinical site, recategorized and repriced as needed.
    1. To never engage in the crime of “practice of medicine without a license,” or any activity that could be construed as such. The term “hands-on” refers to situations where a patient and supervising physician allow an AMS member to communicate with that patient without giving their opinions or interpreting any of the data with anyone but the supervising physician (i.e. learning how to greet the patients, learning how to elicit chief complaints and applicable histories), or coming in contact with that patient without being responsible for physical exams, triages or determining diagnosis or devising treatment plans (i.e. taking vital signs, listening to or percussing body parts, when available), but never engaging in any activity that may tend to leave the patient with the impression that the AMS member is a “doctor” or “physician” by means of: introducing or referring to themselves as one; wearing a long lab coat; interpreting any data to the patient; diagnosing any patients; writing in patient or medical records; accepting any sort of gift or money from anyone during their AMS membership, or any other activity that could be construed as acting as a doctor, or could create the impression that the member is licensed to practice medicine;
    2. To always be supervised (within the reach of voice) by the attending physician that AMS has formally assigned and certified that member to, and to never overstay his/her CB or misrepresent that he/she is covered by AMS professional medical liability insurance policy for CBs that are not directly authorized and certified by AMS;
    3. To abide by the AMS “Zero Tolerance Policy”: Members will respect the privacy and confidentiality of each AP by refraining from contact with any AMS CS or AP without the written permission of AMS, or prior to the designated CB start date(s) and time(s). Members agree not to distribute, or publish, to anyone the names and locations of the CB and AP to which they have been assigned. Members may NOT arrange clinicals on their own while enrolled with AMS. The risks and costs, both to the member and to AMS, associated with this are extreme, including but not limited to: uninsured patient exposures, endangering the AP and CS, and risking the member’s own future medical licensure. Therefore, all members agree that non-compliance with this policy will constitute a breach of the membership agreement, and an offending member’s current CB and AMS membership will be immediately terminated, without refund;
    4. To be in good standing with AMS, and, if applicable, to be in good standing with his/her sponsoring institution (i.e., school). Members must possess a valid AMS membership throughout his/her clinical block(s) and must at all times abide by the AMS membership enrollment agreement;
    5. To forego any special prices or promotions the member may have received in the event the member downgrades;
    6. That he/she is not guaranteed to be placed or work with medical schools or residency programs;
    7. To show up to each CB on the exact date, time, and location (clinical schedule) that he/she has agreed;
    8. That the zip code indicated in the “Within 50 Miles of” column of a clinical schedule is an approximate and tentative location, and not the final confirmed zip code. Although unlikely, members agree to travel up to 50 miles from the original agreed-upon zip code for each CB;
    9. To have their own personal transportation (not simply relying on public transportation or share-a-ride with the AP) since an AP may rotate through several hospitals in a single day, or ask that a member show up to a late-night emergency hospital call, or the designated CS may be located up to 50 miles away from the confirmed zip code that members first report to;
    10. That enrolling with AMS does not guarantee medical residency or interviews;
    11. That while letters of recommendation (“LORs”) may be solicited by members from AP, LORs are not guaranteed and are strictly performance-based. AMS has no control over the contents or verbiage or letterhead of any LOR;
    12. To not make requests that would be deemed discriminatory. AMS respects all people and adheres to a strict non-discrimination policy. AMS will not accept requests for clinical placements based on race, ethnicity, religion, gender, and/or sexual orientation;
    13. That AMS does not provide accommodation or transportation services.
  8. Expect changes: after all, this is medicine!
    1. AMS takes every reasonable measure to deliver the CB experience that was agreed upon by each member. However, CBs are “boutique” experiences and changes may occur: extenuating circumstances that are out of the control of AMS may affect any component of a member’s clinical schedule, and on rare occasions require a completely new clinical schedule;
    2. Members are encouraged to check their email inbox and voice messages frequently, and to keep a constant and open line of communication with their designated AMS National Clinical Coordinator;
    3. Should unforeseen events result in a change to any CB, AMS will dedicate appropriate resources to rectify the situation. Members will fully cooperate and hold AMS harmless in case of any changes.
  9. Eagerness to participate and quality of experience: although CBs typically take place during normal business hours, the experience of individual members can vary depending on the eagerness of the member. The more eager and available a member is to participate in a CB (up to 24 hours/day, 7 days/week), the greater the amount of clinical opportunities and inpatient exposures that will be available. Additionally APs may prefer to round on their hospital admitted patients during nights or weekends, or on consecutive days followed by a block of break. Therefore, an individual member’s availability, transportation, attitude, and behavior may contribute to their overall clinical experience and quality.
  10. Rush to start: a member’s first CB may begin in as few as three weeks after becoming Fully Enrolled Certified (FEC; receipt of all required documents and payments by AMS). Please inquire about the option to start in 1 or 2 weeks using our FASTART™ service (where available; additional fees apply).
What should I expect during “For Credit” U.S. Clinical Electives through AmeriClerkships?2019-02-11T13:00:14-07:00

For-credit U.S. Clinical Clerkships/Rotations (Clerkships) at AmeriClerkships Medical Society (AMS) are reserved for medical students or medical residents who are required to complete a pre-set clinical curriculum by their medical institution for graduation. Clerkships differs from Volunteer U.S. Clinical Experiences (USCE) in that:

  1. All medical students and residents must complete a Clinical Authorization Letter (CAL) in order for AMS to determine if they need to be placed in Clerkships or USCE, in states with no known adverse laws against them conducting their type of clinicals in that state, and;
  2. Some states have policies governing Clerkships conducted by both U.S. and International Medical Students (IMS): click here to visit the AMS Medical Licensure Forum, and;
  3. Where and how an IMS conducts Clerkships can affect future licensure: click here to read how AMS is Protecting International Medical Students, and;
  4. There are more than just 2 types of Clerkships (erroneously referred to as “Green” or “Blue Book” rotations): click here for 5 categories of Clerkships at AMS, and;
  5. Their completion will lead to the issuance of credit from their medical institution (i.e. for-credit), and;
  6. Their limited engagement in certain patient care activities may be interpreted as the practice of medicine by certain states (which is different for each state; simply Google search “is medical student clerkship considered “practice of medicine” in [type in state of your Clerkship]).

Please note that:

  • All AMS Certified USCE are insured with professional liability insurance ($1/$3 million), supervised by AMS affiliated U.S. licensed physicians. Upon completion of Clerkships, AMS members may ask for a post-clinical evaluation and solicit letters of recommendation from their supervising physicians.
  • There are several U.S. jurisdictions which have limitations placed on visiting rotations by medical students attending non-U.S. accredited Medical Institutions, and medical residents crossing state borders for practice of medicine, and it is every medical professional’s (medical student, graduate, resident or doctor) responsibility to remain in compliance with State Medical Board (SMB) rules & regulations for clerkships and future medical licensure. Furthermore, each AMS member is responsible for securing any needed documents from AMS in order to share with his/her medical institution for permissions or credits, and to allow the medical institution to obtain any necessary permissions from individual SMB (since SMBs will only work with Students or Medical Institution for school approvals & Clinical authorizations, and not AMS) prior to any start of clinicals with AMS. Enrolling with AMS does not alleviate an AMS member’s obligations and responsibilities to remain in full compliance with any state medical board and their medical institution’s policies. Please click here for more details.

Prior to the Start of Your Clerkship

Begin familiarizing yourself with the medical specialty that you’re assigned to by clicking here. Make sure that you receive your welcome package (mailed to a U.S. address you provide us; email your NCC if you haven’t received it by week prior to your start), which amongst other items will contain your specially-sized AmeriClerkships embroidered short lab coat; wear this lab coat and dress business formal at all times during your clinical blocks unless instructed otherwise by your attending. The clinical block(s) you enrolled in will become fully approved and confirmed again once you become Fully Enrolled Certified (FEC). This is also the time that your AMS National Clinical Coordinator (NCC) will contact and introduce him/herself to you as he/she is responsible for the implementation of what you enrolled in with AMS (as outlined in your invoice), and to start you on time. Your NCC is also responsible for emailing (or calling in) your final confirmation to you at the “time of highest confidence“, meaning the time when to the best judgment of your NCC, your clinical location has the least likelihood of changing – which could be as late as the Friday before you begin. Your confirmation email will contain the name and contact information about your attending, where and when to show up, and any other information that is unique to that site. You can also view your individually confirmed clinical blocks online at https://myclinicals.acmedical.org/, and search surrounding points of interest (i.e. shopping, airports, rental cars, rental apartments, etc). Last but not least, make sure that you have viewed the AmeriClerkships orientation webinar.

Can changes occur? Possibly; your NCC will discuss unusual situations and all options with you in case of an unexpected emergency. But not to worry, as your AMS team is in most cases prepared, and typically has backup clinical sites for most members. Possible unforeseen changes are also the reason why your NCC wait as long as we can to send out final confirmations (i.e. “time of highest confidence”, such as the Friday before you begin). If a change is initiated by you, then we will do our best to accommodate, but can not guarantee that we will be able to change your original scheduled clinical block(s) since all clinical blocks are scheduled sequentially, so a change made by you will affect future scheduled members at those same clinical sites. For AMS policy on changes, please click here and search for “Changes”.

The Start of Your First Clerkship Week

Follow the instructions on your confirmation email about when, where and what time to start your first day. Attending physicians are reasonable, but you must make it easy for them to see your commitment to your scheduled clinical block. Start with an open mind, and let your attending know that you’d like to see and experience EVERYTHING that this clinical block has to offer, including late-night admissions and multiple hospital visits. Your first location may not be the same location as your future meetings with your attending. Each physician is different, but he/she will most likely quickly evaluate your ability to function within that clinical setting by having you follow them with little to no responsibilities during the first few days. The quicker you learn and adapt, the higher the physician’s expectation of you will be. Don’t ever be late, and always have your own transportation. If you’re visiting the U.S. from abroad, then secure your international driver’s license so that you don’t miss out on any clinical experience opportunity, such as witnessing late night admissions or visiting multiple clinical sites/hospitals across town where public transportation is unavailable or unsafe or time-consuming. Do not ask for a letter of recommendation until you have seen your clinical evaluation in your final week; otherwise, you may risk upsetting the attending and making him/her feel like you’re using them for a recommendation letter, instead of obtaining the clinical experience to show your commitment for that specialty. Again, please review the AmeriClerkships orientation webinar for more details.

During Your Clerkship

Although each clinical experience is unique, the following is an outline of what AMS members enrolled in Clerkships can expect to experience, and be encouraged to master during each clinical block:

  1. Professional Qualities and Adaptability: integrity, tolerance, confidentiality, punctuality, reliability, teachability/learnability, bilateral acculturation (accepting U.S., as well as incorporating home culture), initiative, participation, teamwork, receptivity to feedback, mindfulness, dedication;
  2. U.S. Medical Knowledge: basic medical sciences, clinical sciences, access to medical education resources;
  3. Familiarity with U.S. Healthcare System: U.S. culture, HIPAA, insurance, formulary, medico-legal, interdisciplinary healthcare system;
  4. Clinical Skills: medical histories:
    1. Example of Activity: initially broad inquiries followed by specifics as indicated by Chief Complaint (CC) and History of Present Illness (HPI); rephrase patient responses or offer smiles to clarify inadequate answers; sequentially question associated symptoms and pursuit of associations which may not be intuitive; thoroughly explore all risk factors; selectively use of follow-up questions with deeper probing of critical information; clearly organize patterns of questions from general to specific. THEREFORE with your supervisor in the room and with a patient’s permission you can speak with the patient and write notes (not in patient chart), but you can not conduct a physical exam.
    2. Note: You may discuss findings from the supervised patient encounter with the physician and discuss differentials, but you must never be the one who conducts any physical exams as this is the job of a licensed professional. A physical examination is defined as an evaluation of the body and its functions using inspection, palpation (feeling with the hands), percussion (tapping with the fingers), and auscultation (listening). A complete health assessment also includes gathering information about a person’s medical history and lifestyle, doing laboratory tests, and screening for disease.
  5. Communication Skills: written and spoken English proficiency; patients and families (Strong: Consistently confirms that understanding is clear by repetition, soliciting questions; explains any medical terminology used; always respectful in addressing; genuine effort to understand and respect diverse beliefs and attitudes); with colleagues, nursing and ancillary staff;
  6. Information Technology Skills: electronic medical records, information retrieval (clinical data and reference material);
  7. Presentation Skills: patient and educational presentations, case updates, rounds, discharge, admission,
  8. Included Comments: observations or information that the physician believes would be of value to those who may be assessing this applicant as a potential residency candidate.

At the End of Your Clerkship

Unless another type of clinical evaluation has been provided to us by you or your medical institution, AMS will email a post-clinical evaluation to your supervising attending physician that is based on the 6 ACGME Core Competencies. Please click here to familiarize yourself with this helpful table.

Most-all AMS members participate in clerkships in order to experience how care is provided to patients in the United States and to hopefully secure a letter of recommendation that documents their overall performance on the above-mentioned competencies. In order to ask your mentor to willingly recommend you to residency, make sure that you do as follows:

  • Follow the above recommendations
  • Earn your LOR, meaning you should put all that you have in performing genuinely and to the best of your abilities
  • Midway through your Clerkship block: print this page, and ask the attending to give you verbal feedback on the above competencies
  • Toward the end of your 3rd week: ask the attending if its okay for them to complete the AMS clinical evaluation of you in person, next week sometime
  • Last week of your Clerkship: if your attending evaluated you well on all competencies, then ask them if they can support you in your pursuit of residency by writing you a letter of recommendation. Give them a copy of your AMS prepared CV, and ask them to email you a draft copy of the LOR so that you can have your Advisors at AMS analyze it for you (Letter of Recommendation Analysis). Ask if they’d like a copy of your LORA, and if so, then share what AMS provides you with the attending. If not then email the AMS recommendations back to the attending.

Please contact us with any questions.

What should I expect during “Not for Credit” U.S. Clinical Electives through AmeriClerkships?2019-02-11T13:00:59-07:00

U.S. Clinical Experiences (USCE) at AmeriClerkships Medical Society (AMS) are reserved for active members (either medical students during their vacation times visiting the U.S., or medical graduates in between graduation and start of residency) who are looking to do good for the community at large as clinical volunteers, or are looking to strengthen their commitment to a particular field of medicine by securing letters of recommendation or to improve their chances of securing U.S. residencies. AMS members completing a USCE are not expecting a medical institution to issue credit for the clinicals they just completed (i.e. not-for-credit), nor shall their supervising physician require such members to do anything that could be interpreted as the practice of medicine without a license (which is different for each state; simply Google search “practicing medicine without a license in [type in state of your USCE]”  before you begin your USCE).

Please note that:

  • All AMS Certified USCE are insured with professional liability insurance ($1/$3 million), supervised by AMS affiliated U.S. licensed physicians, and set up so that AMS members can see how their licensed supervisors practice medicine in the United States (instead of AMS members being the ones who practice medicine), AND;
  • Conducting USCE as volunteers does not forfeit your rights to post-clinical evaluations or soliciting letters of recommendation by your supervising physicians, AND;
  • There are several U.S. jurisdictions which have limitations placed on visiting rotations by medical students attending non-U.S. accredited Medical Institutions, and medical residents crossing state borders for practice of medicine, and it is every medical professional’s (medical student, graduate, resident or doctor) responsibility to remain in compliance with State Medical Board (SMB) rules & regulations for clerkships and future medical licensure. Furthermore, each AMS member is responsible for securing any needed documents from AMS in order to share with his/her medical institution for permissions or credits, and to allow the medical institution to obtain any necessary permissions from individual SMB (since SMBs will only work with Students or Medical Institution for school approvals & Clinical authorizations, and not AMS) prior to any start of clinicals with AMS. Enrolling with AMS does not alleviate an AMS member’s obligations and responsibilities to remain in full compliance with any state medical board and their medical institution’s policies. Please click here for more details.

Prior to the Start of Your USCE

Begin familiarizing yourself with the medical specialty that you’re assigned to by clicking here. Make sure that you receive your welcome package (mailed to a U.S. address you provide us; email your NCC if you haven’t received it a week prior to your start), which amongst other items will contain your specially sized AmeriClerkships embroidered short lab coat; wear this lab coat and dress business formal at all times during your clinical blocks unless instructed otherwise by your attending. The clinical block(s) you enrolled in will become fully approved and confirmed again once you become Fully Enrolled Certified (FEC). This is also the time that your AMS National Clinical Coordinator (NCC) will contact and introduce him/herself to you as he/she is responsible for the implementation of what you enrolled in with AMS (as outlined in your invoice), and to start you on time. Your NCC is also responsible for emailing (or calling in) your final confirmation to you at the “time of highest confidence“, meaning the time when to the best judgment of your NCC, your clinical location has the least likelihood of changing – which could be as late as the Friday before you begin.  Your confirmation email will contain the name and contact information about your attending, where and when to show up, and any other information that is unique to that site.  You can also view your individually confirmed clinical blocks online in your MyClinicals account, and search surrounding points of interest (i.e. shopping, airports, rental cars, rental apartments, etc). Lastly but not least, make sure that you have viewed the AmeriClerkships orientation webinar.

Can changes occur? Possibly; your NCC will discuss unusual situations and all options with you in case of an unexpected emergency. But not to worry, as your AMS team is in most cases prepared, and typically has backup clinical sites for most members. Possible unforeseen changes are also the reason why your NCC wait as long as we can to send out final confirmations (i.e. “time of highest confidence”, such as the Friday before you begin). If a change is initiated by you, then we will do our best to accommodate, but can not guarantee that we will be able to change your original scheduled clinical block(s) since all clinical blocks are scheduled sequentially, so a change made by you will affect future scheduled members at those same clinical sites. For AMS policy on changes, please click here and search for “Changes”.

The Start of Your First USCE Week

Follow the instructions on your confirmation email about when, where and what time to start your first day. Attending physicians are reasonable, but you must make it easy for them to see your commitment to your scheduled clinical block. Start with an open mind, and let your attending know that you’d like to see and experience EVERYTHING that this clinical block has to offer, including late-night admissions and multiple hospital visits. Your first location may not be the same location as your future meetings with your attending. Each physician is different, but he/she will most likely quickly evaluate your ability to function within that clinical setting by having you follow them with little to no responsibilities during the first few days. The quicker you learn and adapt, the higher the physician’s expectation of you will be. Don’t ever be late, and always have your own transportation. If you’re visiting the U.S. from abroad, then secure your international driver’s license so that you don’t miss out on any clinical experience opportunity, such as witnessing late night admissions or visiting multiple clinical sites/hospitals across town where public transportation is unavailable or unsafe or time-consuming. Do not ask for a letter of recommendation until you have seen your clinical evaluation in your final week; otherwise, you may risk upsetting the attending and making him/her feel like you’re using them for a recommendation letter, instead of obtaining the clinical experience to show your commitment for that specialty. Again, please review the AmeriClerkships orientation webinar for more details.

During Your USCE

Although each clinical experience is unique, the following is an outline of what our volunteer members can expect to experience, and be encouraged to master during each USCE clinical block:

  1. Professional Qualities and Adaptability: integrity, tolerance, confidentiality, punctuality, reliability, teachability/learnability, bilateral acculturation (accepting U.S., as well as incorporating home culture), initiative, participation, teamwork, receptivity to feedback, mindfulness, dedication;
  2. U.S. Medical Knowledge: basic medical sciences, clinical sciences, access to medical education resources;
  3. Familiarity with U.S. Healthcare System: U.S. culture, HIPAA, insurance, formulary, medico-legal, interdisciplinary healthcare system;
  4. Clinical Skills: Medical Histories
    1. Example of Activity: initially broad inquiries followed by specifics as indicated by Chief Complaint (CC) and History of Present Illness (HPI); rephrase patient responses or offer smiles to clarify inadequate answers; sequentially question associated symptoms and pursuit of associations which may not be intuitive; thoroughly explore all risk factors; selectively use of follow-up questions with deeper probing of critical information; clearly organize patterns of questions from general to specific. THEREFORE with your supervisor in the room and with a patient’s permission you can speak with the patient and write notes (not in patient chart), but you can not conduct a physical exam.
    2. Note: You may discuss findings from the supervised patient encounter with the physician and discuss differentials, but you must never be the one who conducts any physical exams as this is the job of a licensed professional. A physical examination is defined as an evaluation of the body and its functions using inspection, palpation (feeling with the hands), percussion (tapping with the fingers), and auscultation (listening). A complete health assessment also includes gathering information about a person’s medical history and lifestyle, doing laboratory tests, and screening for disease.
  5. Communication Skills: written and spoken English proficiency; patients and families (Strong: Consistently confirms that understanding is clear by repetition, soliciting questions; explains any medical terminology used; always respectful in addressing; genuine effort to understand and respect diverse beliefs and attitudes); with colleagues, nursing and ancillary staff;
  6. Information Technology Skills: electronic medical records, information retrieval (clinical data and reference material);
  7. Presentation Skills: patient and educational presentations, case updates, rounds, discharge, admission,
  8. Included Comments: observations or information that the physician believes would be of value to those who may be assessing this applicant as a potential residency candidate.

At the End of Your USCE

Unless another type of clinical evaluation has been provided to us by you or your medical institution, AMS will email a Post-clinical evaluation to your supervising attending physician that is based on the 6 ACGME Core Competencies. Please click here to familiarize yourself with this helpful table.

Most-all AMS members participate in USCE in order to experience how care is provided to patients in the United States and to hopefully secure a letter of recommendation that documents their overall performance on the above-mentioned competencies. In order to ask your mentor to willingly recommend you to residency, make sure that you do as follows:

  • Follow the above recommendations
  • Earn your LOR, meaning you should put all that you have in performing genuinely and to the best of your abilities
  • Midway through your USCE block: print this page, and ask the attending to give you verbal feedback on the above competencies
  • Toward the end of your 3rd week: ask the attending if its okay for them to complete the AMS clinical evaluation of you in person, next week sometime
  • Last week of your USCE: if your attending evaluated you well on all competencies, then ask them if they can support you in your pursuit of residency by writing you a letter of recommendation. Give them a copy of your AMS prepared CV, and ask them to email you a draft copy of the LOR so that you can have your Advisors at AMS analyze it for you (Letter of Recommendation Analysis). Ask if they’d like a copy of your LORA, and if so, then share what AMS provides you with the attending. If not then email the AMS recommendations back to the attending.

Please contact us with any questions.

Why is it recommend that I combine my Membership with U.S. clinicals offered by AmeriClerkships?2019-04-06T08:02:06-07:00

All of your hard work to secure the best U.S. clinical experiences must be correctly and consistently represented in every aspect of your residency application, and again during your interviews. An AmeriClerkships Membership will do just that, by preparing you for what’s to come in the annual U.S. medical residency or fellowship match, and even off-cycle residency positions. Our Memberships are built on the idea that dedicated expert mentorship will help you avoid catastrophic mistakes, offering you continuous suggestions to make your application package to U.S. medical residencies or fellowships more competitive, every step of the way. This way, you can have a better chance at being noticed by carefully explaining how your U.S. clinical experiences have played a role in making you a more U.S. medical residency-relevant candidate, and not be eliminated for simple and avoidable application mistakes. Plus, all AmeriClerkships Memberships (except for Match Mentor) cover you with our $1/3 million professional liability umbrella insurance policy, so you can save money and future regrets by not having to secure your own, or securing the incorrect insurance policy.

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